Tokyo Olympics: The 6 new sports explained

Climbing, skateboarding, karate and more are all making their debut at the Tokyo Olympics.

The Tokyo Olympics is just about to kick off, with the opening ceremony just hours away. This year we’re seeing the debut of around six new sports. Climbing is making a long overdue appearance, alongside skateboarding. Surfing and karate are also along for the ride with baseball and softball.

Here’s everything you need to know.

New sports at the Tokyo Olympics

Karate

Fittingly, karate — a martial art that originated in Okinawa during the Ryukyu Dynasty — makes its Olympic debut in Tokyo, joining judo, taekwondo and wrestling. It consists of two disciplines for both men and women: kata (forms) and kumite (sparring).

In kata, the athletes demonstrate a series of offensive and defensive movements against a virtual opponent and are evaluated on strength, speed, rhythm, balance and power, among other things, using a points system.

In kumite, two weight-matched competitors face off in an 8 by 8 meter area for 3 minutes. They’re awarded points when they land strikes, kicks or punches with good form, power and control on the target area of their opponent’s body. The person with the most points at the end of the match or the first person to amass an eight-point lead is declared the winner. Want to dive deeper into karate? Head to the World Karate Federation’s site for more.

Skateboarding

Once a sport relegated to the streets of southern California and mostly niche competitions, skateboarding is making its Olympic debut. Men’s and women’s Olympic skateboarding will consist of two events: park and street. The street course is designed to replicate street skating, with stairs, ramps and rails that riders can use to put together a series of tricks. Athletes skate individually on three timed runs and are scored on things like the difficulty of their tricks, speed, height and originality. Only their highest-scoring run is taken into consideration for overall rankings.

The park event takes place on more of a bowl-shaped course, in the sense that it looks hollowed out. Riders use the inclines within the course to build momentum and perform tricks. They’re judged on difficulty and originality, among other things. Learn more about competitive skateboarding.    ReadMore

Source : cnet

Register Form

Name
Email Address
Phone No